Why I swear by epsom salts. – Gary Young MySpace Blog

Why I swear by epsom salts.

A little punctuation can make a big difference.

  • Why?  I swear by epsom salts.
  • Why I swear.  By Epsom Salts.

And a little emphasis, too.

  • What is this thing called love?
  • What is this thing called, love?

Epsom  salt is magnesium sulfate — MgSO4.  When magnesium sulfate is placed  in a liquid it separates into magnesium and sulfate.  It is absorbed  through the skin and can continue to be absorbed (if it remains on the  skin) for four to nine hours.  It’s easy to find in grocery stores and  convenience stores.

When I first started running on the  treadmill in 2003 I started feeling stiff around my upper leg.  Like,  where the leg meets the hip, more or less.  It started to hurt a little  bit.  I ran some more.  It started to hurt a lot.  Eventually, I could  barely walk up and down flights of stairs.  Then I could barely walk at  all.  It hurt when I lay down, when I stood, walked, sat.  I borrowed  one of my grandmother’s canes.  It was that bad.  I was about to go to  the doctor, which usually means that I’m in extreme pain or in fear of  losing a bodily or sensory function up to and including life.

After  nearly two weeks it started to get a little better but every time it  got better I’d  use the leg more and it would get even worse.  People  recommended soaking in a tub with epsom salts.  I did.

Within a  day and a half I felt a lot better.  And it improved from there.  It  wasn’t one soak, by the way.  I soaked daily.  Then a few times a  week.  (I’m soaking this week because my legs are depleted and  exhausted from mtn biking above and beyond my current fitness.)

The  following is from the Epsom Salt Industry Council’s web page, which  sums up the info from all of the google search results and wikipedia  entries I read.

Better health through soaking

Magnesium  can be ingested as a nutritional supplement, but studies show that a  wide variety of factors – the presence of specific foods or drugs,  certain medical conditions, even the individual chemistry of a person’s  stomach acid – can interfere with their effectiveness. But all of the  subjects in a recent study experienced increased magnesium levels from  soaking in a bath enriched with magnesium sulfate crystals, commonly  known as Epsom Salt.

Researchers and physicians report that raising your magnesium levels may:

  • Improve  heart and circulatory health, reducing irregular heartbeats, preventing  hardening of the arteries, reducing blood clots and lowering blood  pressure.
  • Improve the body’s ability to use insulin, reducing the incidence or severity of diabetes.
  • Flush toxins and heavy metals from the cells, easing muscle pain and helping the body to eliminate harmful substances.
  • Improve  nerve function by regulating electrolytes. Also, calcium is the main  conductor for electrical current in the body, and magnesium is  necessary to maintain proper calcium levels in the blood.
  • Relieve  stress. Excess adrenaline and stress are believed to drain magnesium, a  natural stress reliever, from the body. Magnesium is necessary for the  body to bind adequate amounts of serotonin, a mood-elevating chemical  within the brain that creates a feeling of well being and relaxation.

While  increasing your magnesium levels, Epsom Salt also delivers sulfates,  which are extremely difficult to get through food but which readily  absorb through the skin. Sulfates serve a wide variety of functions in  the body, playing a vital role in the formation of brain tissue, joint  proteins and the mucin proteins that line the walls of the digestive  tract. Sulfates also stimulate the pancreas to generate digestive  enzymes and are believed to help detoxify the body’s residue of  medicines and environmental contaminants.

Currently listening :
Circle
By Eddie Izzard
Release date: By 23 September, 2003
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